A Little Bit of This & That

The Random Things We Love to Make and Do

Muffin Tin Monday – Telling Time May 1, 2011

Filed under: Food — Lizz @ 9:52 pm
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Tick Tock!  It’s Muffin Tin Time!!

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Or…It’s Time via Muffin Tin!

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Either way, this tin was a big hit in our house this weekend.  Skylar has been working on telling time.  This is a really difficult concept for kids to understand, so we’ve been doing a lot of practicing.  I thought this would be a fun way to, yet again, talk about reading a clock face.  So, here’s the tin:

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The odd numbers were all done out of a slice of american cheese, with my new number cutters (part of a Wilton set of letter and number fondant cutters).  (This could also be a good time to talk about odd and even numbers)  Each even number spot has that number of items. So…

2 Peeps

4 Cheddar Chicken Nuggets

6 Smiley Face Fries

8 Apple Slices

10 Pineapple pieces

12 Jelly Beans

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The hands of the clock were made from dried spaghetti noodles and string cheese pieces.

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I showed this tin to Skylar and asked her what time it was.  Her response was “How am I supposed to know?!”  I started to explain how all the cups are supposed to actually be numbers, and before I finished my sentence, she said “Hold it!” (and put her sassy little “stop” hand up to my face!) “It’s 2 o’clock!”  A success!! (time-telling wise.  Looks like we need a little conversation about manners though!)

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I’m really pleased with this one.  What do you all think?  Wouldn’t you love to have a muffin tin clock?

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Make sure you check out what the other amazing moms have made for their kid’s muffin tin meals this week over a Muffin Tin Mom’s Site.
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Muffin Tin Monday at Muffintinmom.com

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Have a great week!

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Lizz

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Self Checking Flashcards March 5, 2011

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When I was in college, working toward my elementary education degree, I went to a math conference.  I know it’s nerdy, but I attended a really interesting session called “Math on a Budget”.  Any teacher, or parent working with kids at home, knows that teaching math is not only hard to explain to a young child, but it can also get expensive.  All the little bits and bobs you need to demonstrate math concepts can be purchased, but they really add up after a while.  Or, you can find creative ways to make them yourselves.  This idea came from that session, and even though I didn’t need them yet, I created them right away.  I still have them, approximately 8 years later.

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I created large flashcards, one set for addition and one for multiplication.  The front side has a main number, and a smaller set of numbers 0-10 along the bottom.  Each number along the bottom has a hole next to it.

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(each card in the set has a different large main number 0-10)

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The backside has the answers.

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Have your child pick a number and put a golf tee into that hole (or something else long and thin like a pencil tip, chopstick, ect.).

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Now do the problem.  In our photo example, it would be 6 + 3.  Once your child comes up with the answer, they turn over the card without removing the golf tee.

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The tee will be poking out next to the correct answer, allowing your child to check his own answers!

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When I originally created these, I traced a large graphic onto construction paper, cut it out, used a sharpie to create nice dark details, and white paper for the eyes.  I used a regular hold punch around the edges and then wrote in all the numbers, making sure that the answers corresponded correctly on the back.  I then had them all laminated (since I was planning on using them in a classroom and needed them to be very durable).  Finally, I re-punched the holes.  That was 8 years ago, before the miracle of easy to use computer programs.

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An alternative to this process would be to find a nice computer graphic, and print it onto cardstock.  Use something your child is into like trains, dinosaurs, princess stuff, or even pictures of the family.  My graphics were large and fit 2 per page.  Cardstock should be durable enough to not require lamination.  If you have older kids, you could also make sets for subtraction and division.

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I hope you and your little mathlete enjoy these as much as we do.  Have a great rest of the weekend!

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Lizz

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.UPDATE: I have decided to submit this to Made by You Monday on the Skip to My Lou Website.  You can click the picture below to see some of the other amazing things that have been made this week!

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I am also submitting this to Tip Junkie’s Tip Me Tuesday!  Check out the other amazing crafts ect. by clicking the image below!


Tip Junkie handmade projects

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Also submitting to Funky Polka Dot Giraffe’s Too Cute Tuesday.  Click the image to see the great projects done over there!
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I’m also submitting this project to Sun Scholar’s For the Kids Friday.  Want to find great projects just for kids?  Click Here to see more!

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100th Day Project February 4, 2011

Filed under: Art Projects,Things To Do — Lizz @ 10:14 am
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On Monday (or maybe Wednesday, since there were just 2 snow days), my little kiddo will have been a Kindergartener for 100 days!  My goodness the time has passed so quickly!  I feel like she just had her first day of school.

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As requested by her teacher, we put together a little collection for the kid’s 100th day of school party.  We were supposed to find a collection of 100 items.  Since my kiddo goes to a different school in the morning, she needs to be able to carry this collection herself, so it can’t be too large or too heavy.  Hmm… What do we have lots of, that we could turn into an interesting 100 collection?  Pony tail holders!!!

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We made our collection a little more interesting by adding the element of patterns and counting by 10’s.

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First Skylar made a pattern with 10 pony tail holders of her choice.  Then she knotted them together.  Then she did a new pattern, until she had 10 different patterns.  Some of the patterns were based on color, and some by size.

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Next, we counted how many groups of 10 we had.  Then we counted to 100 by 10.

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Then, we knotted the pattern groups together, end to end, to create one long line of 100 pony tail holders.  I showed her that she could still count by tens because you could easily see the different patterns representing each group of 10.

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Finally, we completed the project by doing what the teacher requested.  Skylar counted each individual pony tail holder. 1-100.

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She really did a great job, and is very good at counting.  We found that the whole chain easily reaches across our living room.  Without stretching, it’s about 17.5 feet long.  Stretching it out is up to the bravery of the people holding it.

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Skylar is really excited to show her class what she made for her collection.  And I am happy to have been a part of the project.

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Have any of you done a fun 100th day project?  Leave a comment and tell us all about it!

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Have a great weekend!

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Lizz