A Little Bit of This & That

The Random Things We Love to Make and Do

Egg Mold Tutorial October 13, 2010

Filed under: Food,Tips — Lizz @ 10:16 am
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If you read my post yesterday (click here if you missed it), then you are probably back to learn just how one can make an egg into another shape.  I learned about egg molds while reading anotherlunch.com.  This mom makes amazing bento box meals for her kids, and I am nothing short of impressed.  I noticed at one point that she used an egg in the shape of a fish!  I dug into the website a little further and learned how she did it here.

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I thought I would put together my own tutorial to show everyone specifically what I did to make my egg flowers.

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I purchased this set of egg molds, containing one heart and one star:

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The directions are in Japanese, and therefore useless to me.  I looked for these at a few local asian markets, but no luck.  I was only able to find them in the one place that you can find just about anything.  Amazon.

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When out of the package, they will look something like this:

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Now on to the eggs…

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First, I made hard-boiled eggs.  Use the same method as I explained in yesterday’s post, but DO NOT cool the eggs down.  They must be molded while still hot.  After shaking the eggs to crack the shell, cover the pot and take out one egg at a time.  When making a large batch of eggs (i.e. the dozen I made), you will probably need to boil the eggs in a few different batches of 3-4 eggs at a time to make sure they stay hot enough, especially if you are only working with one mold.

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Carefully remove one egg from the pot, using a ladle, and replace the lid.  I found the ladle to be the perfect way to handle the hot egg.  Run some cold water over the egg for just a few seconds.  This will make it just cool enough to touch, and help to separate the egg from the shell.

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Carefully peel the egg.  You do not want to crack the egg white, or rip chunks off of it.  Take your peeled egg and stand it up in the bottom of the mold.

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Line up the top of the mold (there is a little peg and hole that must match up or it won’t close).  Gently push the top of the mold down until you are able to snap the side clips down.

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The egg must now cool in order to set.  You can put it into the fridge, but it is much faster to put the mold into a bowl of ice water.

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Once cooled, take the top of the mold off.

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You have probably noticed 2 things.  First of all, there are going to be some egg pieces that get squished in the wrong place.  Leave the egg in the bottom of the mold and use a butter knife to trim those pieces off.  Secondly, the egg doesn’t seem to quite reach all the way out to fill the whole star.  When I took this picture, I was using extra-large eggs.  When I made the eggs for the contest, I used jumbo eggs.  They filled a little better, but I don’t think the egg will ever look like a perfect star (thus the change to flowers, which was perfect).  If you choose to get egg molds, you will need to test your out to see what size egg will work best.

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From here, I removed the egg from the mold.  I used dental floss to cut the eggs horizontally, not the traditional vertical cut.  By doing this, you will see that the yolk will seem to go almost all the way from one side to the other.  This just means you have to be a little more careful to not rip the whites.

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From here, you will make deviled eggs as you would normally.  It should look something like this when jumbo eggs are used:

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I found that in order to make my egg flowers stay on the tray (since I needed to take it in the car), I needed to cut a small piece off the bottom of the egg, making a flat surface.  This isn’t really necessary if you are not planning to move the tray around.

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I thought it was a good idea to practice this a few times before attempting the official contest eggs.  There is nothing wrong with this, as any practice attempts, broken whites, or funky looking eggs can simply be chopped up and eaten as egg salad!

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Yum!

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I can’t wait for more excuses to use my egg molds.  It really adds an interesting touch to an item that most people didn’t know could be shaped differently.  Plus, Skylar thought it was just so cool.  And anything that impresses my daughter makes me happy.

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Have Fun!

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Lizz

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I have linked this post to these parties:
Made by You Mondays @ Skip to my Lou
CraftOManiac Mondays @ CraftOManiac
I Wear My Crafty Pants on Monday with Miss Craft Pants
Inspire Me Mondays @ Singing Three Little Birds
Craftastic Monday @ Sew Can Do

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5 Responses to “Egg Mold Tutorial”

  1. […] I loved making these eggs!  The idea of having a contest to make the best deviled eggs must be credited to my mother.  This family gathering was riddled with anticipation to taste and judge all of the entries.  I, of course, went for presentation, as this was the first time I ever made deviled eggs on my own.  To find out who won, you’re going to have to check out the post!  There is also a follow-up post for this one, explaining how to create the flower shaped eggs, using an egg shaper.  Check it out *HERE*. […]

  2. […] have made these egg flowers before. (If you want to see how to make them, click here for my egg mold tutorial) I made this mistake this time of using large eggs instead of extra large, […]

  3. Lyuba Says:

    Those are so cute!

  4. We love our egg molds! They are so fun! Love the flowers as deviled eggs!!!

  5. Wow! So neat! I had no idea you could do this!

    I host a weekly Friday link up part I would love you to join if you are interested!

    Ashley
    http://www.simplydesigning.blogspot.com


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